working on Facebook?

I know, I know, it’s not Friday, what happened to the Friday morning posts? I’m trying to get back in that rhythm.

Anyway, this morning, I added the JSTOR application to my Facebook page. Yep, you can open the social networking site and in between looking at your friend’s updates and sending them virtual gifts, you can search for articles on that assignment topic you’ve been meaning to do.

I searched for instructional technology of course and found an interesting article on using technology in an introductory International Relations course in the journal PS: Political Science & Politics. The 1997 article discussed the use of multimedia maps, the Web, CD-ROMs, and PowerPoints. It also discussed student problems and the need for instruction on how to distinguish between authoritative and questionable Web sites, as well as guidance on organizing gathered information. This was before the days of Zotero, but students might need guidance with that tool, as well.

If you’re familiar with Facebook, you already know that there are other educational applications such as ones that help you organize your class schedule. In fact, Facebook lists 356 applications related to education, although that list includes such questionable apps as “How Stupid Are You?” 8-D

Surely this trend of integrating work and play will continue, and some colleges have already created their own academic social networking sites as an extension of the portal concept. You might call it one-stop shopping, and I do hate to use a consumerist label, but access to everything in one place is one way of organizing the glut of communication and work-related information resources we use everyday.

Advertisements


Categories: technology

%d bloggers like this: